Damaged Heart Muscles Washington DC

Researchers have genetically engineered cells that help form scar tissue after a heart attack into a type of cell that does just the opposite -- repairs damage to the heart muscle.

Richard Hart, MD
(703) 241-1010
6400 Arlington Blvd
Falls Church, VA
Business
MSG of NOVA
Specialties
Cardiology

Data Provided by:
Henry W Williams Jr, MD
(202) 865-3250
2139 Georgia Ave NW Ste 4THF
Washington, DC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Howard Univ Coll Of Med, Washington Dc 20059
Graduation Year: 1962

Data Provided by:
James Aloysius Ronan
(202) 745-4300
425 2nd St Nw
Washington, DC
Specialty
Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Pamela Curtis Steele, MD
(202) 745-8610
810 Vermont Ave NW
Washington, DC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Stanford Univ Sch Of Med, Stanford Ca 94305
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided by:
Habteab B Feseha, MD
Howard Univ Hosp-Med
Washington, DC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Gondar Coll Of Med Sci, Addis Ababa Univ, Gondar, Ethiopia
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Robert Roswell, MD
300 Massachusetts Ave NW Apt 706
Washington, DC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Joel Kupersmith
(202) 254-0183
810 Vermont Ave Nw
Washington, DC
Specialty
Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Roger O Egeberg, MD, FACC
(202) 293-0592
HC7A 200 Independence Ave S W,
Washington, DC
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
James Frederick Burris, MD
(202) 273-8540
810 Vermont Ave NW
Washington, DC
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Columbia Univ Coll Of Physicians And Surgeons, New York Ny 10032
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
Sakiliba M Mines, DR.
(202) 587-2792
1425 K Street Suite 350 Washington, DC 20005
Washington, DC
Specialties
Family Practice, Cardiovascular Diseases, Diabetes
Gender
Female
Languages
English, French
Education
Medical School: Hahnemann Medical College: MD: 1961
Graduation Year: 1950

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Damaged Heart Muscles

Provided By:

Researchers have genetically engineered cells that help form scar tissue after a heart attack into a type of cell that does just the opposite -- repairs damage to the heart muscle, a new study in mice shows.

The research team from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., reprogrammed fibroblasts -- cells that play a role in scarring -- into becoming induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which are stem cells that have been converted from adult cells.

The iPS cells were then transplanted into damaged mouse hearts, where they engrafted after two weeks. After four weeks, the mice hearts had improved structure and function, according to the study authors.

The iPS cells improved heart muscle performance, halted progression of structural damage to the already damaged heart and regenerated tissue at the site of damage, the researchers said.

"This study establishes the real potential for using iPS cells in cardiac treatment," study author Dr. Timothy Nelson said in a Mayo Clinic news release. "Bioengineered fibroblasts acquired the capacity to repair and regenerate infarcted hearts."

This study, which is reported online in the journal Circulation, was the first time iPS cells were used to repair heart tissue. Previous studies have investigated using iPS cells to treat Parkinson's disease, sickle cell anemia and hemophilia A.

Because iPS cells are derived from the patient, there is no risk of rejection or need for anti-rejection drugs, the researchers noted.

The hope is to one day be able to use iPS cells to repair injuries, helping to alleviate the demand for organ transplantation.

"This iPS innovation lays the groundwork for translational applications," senior study author Dr. Andre Terzic, Mayo Clinic physician-scientist, said in the same news release.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on heart attacks.

SOURCE: Mayo Clinic, news release, July 20, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com