Dealing with Financial Stress Frederick MD

When financial stress in Frederick is too much to bear, you should seek help. Simply talking to a trusted friend or family member will allow you to get some things off your chest. If you don’t have anyone to talk to, consider joining a support group or getting counseling. Your local mental health authority can help.

Mr. Chris M. Moran, CFP®
(240) 855-0007
3535 Urbana Pike
Frederick, MD
Firm
PRIME Wealth Management/ Commonwealth Financial Network

Data Provided by:
Ms. Jean M. Joyce, CFP®
(301) 663-8833
Morgan Stanley
Frederick, MD
Firm
Morgan Stanley
Areas of Specialization
Comprehensive Financial Planning, Investment Planning, Life Transitions, Long-Term Care, Retirement Income Management
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $500,001 - $1,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
Mr. Sean Mccomber, CFP®
(240) 215-4709
6 W 2nd St
Frederick, MD
Firm
Key Financial Group
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Budget Development, Business Succession Planning, Charitable Giving, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Debt Management, Divorce Issues
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $250,001 - $500,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000



Data Provided by:
Mr. Brian L. Runkles, CFP®
(301) 360-9840
30 W Patrick St Ste 501
Frederick, MD
Firm
Ameriprise Financial Services,
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Education Planning, Estate Planning, General Financial Planning, Investment Management, Retirement Income Management

Data Provided by:
Mr. Scott A Mccaskill, CFP®
(301) 668-7366
220 West Patrick Street
Frederick, MD
Firm
McCaskill Financial
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Charitable Giving, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Estate Planning, General Financial Planning, Investment Management, Investment Planning
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $500,001 - $1,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000



Data Provided by:
Mr. Daniel Schiffman, CFP®
50 Citizens Way Ste 303
Frederick, MD
Firm
Northwestern Mutual

Data Provided by:
Mr. Lee R. Kramer, CFP®
(240) 379-6929
9099 Ridgefield Dr
Frederick, MD
Firm
Kramer Financial
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Divorce Issues, Elder Care, Estate Planning, General Financial Planning, Investment Management

Data Provided by:
Ms. Jennifer L. Johnson, CFP®
(301) 898-7824
11302 Daysville Rd
Frederick, MD
Firm
TurningPoint Benefit Group, Inc.
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Education Planning, Employee and Employer Plan Benefits, Estate Planning, Government and Military, Insurance Planning
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $500,001 - $1,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Government Employees

Data Provided by:
Yu Zhang, CFP®
(301) 631-7109
30 W Patrick St Fl 7
Frederick, MD
Firm
Morgan Stanley Wealth Management
Areas of Specialization
Charitable Giving, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Estate Planning, Insurance Planning, Intergenerational Planning, Investment Management, Investment Planning
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $500,001 - $1,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Medical/Dental Professionals

Data Provided by:
Shabri G. Moore, CFP®
(301) 631-1207
50 Carroll Creek Way
Frederick, MD
Firm
Moore Wealth Inc
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Budget Development, Business Succession Planning, Charitable Giving, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Divorce Issues, Education Planning
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $500,001 - $1,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Dealing with Financial Stress

Stress can take a toll on our lives and health. During these tumultuous economic times financial stress is particularly bothersome. While cutting corners never hurt anyone, juggling bills and doing without necessities harms both our physical and mental health.

Stress contributes to health problems, including insomnia, depression and anxiety. If that isn’t enough, financial problems may prevent sufferers from getting proper treatment. They may beat themselves up mentally for allowing things to spiral out of control. But that frame of mind can only make things worse. Instead, a more productive use of your energy is to develop a way to get out of debt. Here are some things you can do to prevent or reduce financial stress:

  • Make a budget and stick to it. Start out with bills and necessities such as food and transportation. Put aside some money for unexpected expenses such as medical bills and car repairs, and reserve a small amount for entertainment. Put all of the money that is left over toward paying off your debts, starting with the one with the highest interest rate.
  • Become a penny pincher. Scour the sale papers for the best deals on groceries and other necessities, and seek out coupons for the things you buy. Join the frequent shopper club at every store you visit to take advantage of special deals.
  • Learn to have fun without spending a lot of money. Instead of going out to dinner and a movie, eat in and rent a DVD to watch with your spouse or family. Check your local paper for free events such as concerts. Rediscover the simple (and free) pleasures in life, such as taking a walk around the block and throwing a frisbee in the back yard with the kids.
  • Keep your credit cards out of sight and out of mind. Avoid using them except in the case of a true emergency, where there is no other option.
  • Getting Help

    When financial stress is too much to bear, you should seek help. Simply talking to a trusted friend or family member will allow you to get some things off your chest. If you don’t have anyone to talk to, consider joining a support group or getting counseling. Your local mental health authority can help you find counseling that you can afford.

    If budgeting is your problem, credit counseling could be the answer. Also, see my article on creating a household budget . Credit counseling agencies will often help you set up a budget and learn effective money management for free. If that doesn’t solve your problems, your counselor might be able to set up a debt management plan for you. This involves negotiating lower payments and interest rates on unsecured debt, allowing you to pay it off more quickly and still have money left over each month.

    Financial stress can be devastating for you and your family. Learning to cope and taking control of your finances can help you get your life back on track.

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