Depression in Heart Disease Patients Salisbury MD

Certain depressed patients who suffer from heart disease have nearly double the risk of dying over a seven-year period compared with other depressed patients, researchers say. The patients most at risk are those who suffer from the most severe depression within a few weeks of being hospitalized for a cardiac event, such as a heart attack, and those whose depression doesn't get better within six months, according to study findings published in the September issue of Archives of General Psychiatry.

Harikisan Ramibilas Heda, MD
(410) 749-5419
1109 Riverside Dr
Salisbury, MD
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Cardiology
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Male
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Medical School: Indira Ghandi Med Coll, Nagpur Univ, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1971

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Anthony Jay Frey, MD
(410) 749-4949
5454 Royal Mile Blvd
Salisbury, MD
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Cardiology
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Male
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Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Brooklyn, Coll Of Med, Brooklyn Ny 11203
Graduation Year: 1990

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Bal K Agarwal, MD
(410) 749-5419
5450 Royal Mile Blvd
Salisbury, MD
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Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Diseases
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Male
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Medical School: Sawai Man Singh Med Coll, Univ Of Rajast
Graduation Year: 1963

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Anthony J Frey
(410) 341-0300
1205 Pemberton Dr
Salisbury, MD
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Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

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Prakash Ramaji Dalal, MD
(410) 749-5419
1408 Bell Island Trl
Salisbury, MD
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Cardiology, Internal Medicine
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Male
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Medical School: Indira Ghandi Med Coll, Nagpur Univ, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1973
Hospital
Hospital: Peninsula Regional Med Center, Salisbury, Md
Group Practice: Agarwal & Assoc

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Tomasz A Swierkosz, MD
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26377 Manchester Ct
Salisbury, MD
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Medical School: Coll Med, Univ Jagiellonski, Krakow, Poland
Graduation Year: 1989

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Stephan Pavlos, MD
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5405 Royal Mile Blvd
Salisbury, MD
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Medical School: Univ Of Md Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21201
Graduation Year: 1986
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Hospital: Peninsula Regional Med Center, Salisbury, Md
Group Practice: Peninsula Cardiology Associates Pa

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Joseph Alan Cinderella, MD
(410) 334-2227
100 E Carroll St
Salisbury, MD
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Cardiology, Internal Medicine
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Male
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Medical School: Univ Of Mi Med Sch, Ann Arbor Mi 48109
Graduation Year: 1985
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Hospital: Peninsula Regional Med Center, Salisbury, Md; Atlantic Gen Hosp, Berlin, Md
Group Practice: Mc Lean Frey & Assoc

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Steven Edward Hearne, MD
(410) 546-1670
5417 Royal Mile Blvd
Salisbury, MD
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Medical School: Univ Of Md Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21201
Graduation Year: 1989

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Ramesh K Agarwal
(410) 749-4999
145 E Carroll St
Salisbury, MD
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Depression in Heart Disease Patients

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MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Certain depressed patients who suffer from heart disease have nearly double the risk of dying over a seven-year period compared with other depressed patients, researchers say.

The patients most at risk are those who suffer from the most severe depression within a few weeks of being hospitalized for a cardiac event, such as a heart attack, and those whose depression doesn't get better within six months, according to study findings published in the September issue of Archives of General Psychiatry.

The study authors noted that about one out of every five people who survive a heart attack hit a patch of major depression over the next few weeks. Depression has been known to boost the risk of death after an acute coronary syndrome event, such as heart attack or the chest pain known as unstable angina.

In the new study, Dr. Alexander H. Glassman of Columbia University Medical Center and the New York State Psychiatric Institute in New York City and colleagues examined the medical records of 361 participants in a study of antidepressant use after heart attack.

Regardless of whether the patients took antidepressants, those whose depression didn't improve within six months were more likely to die: 15.6 percent of those whose depression improved died, compared with 28.4 percent of those who had little or no improvement, the researchers reported.

"Depression is a syndrome with multiple pathways to a similar clinical picture. In patients with active coronary heart disease, it seems likely that the association with depression is a two-way street, and each can aggravate the other," the study authors concluded.

More information

To find out more about heart health, visit the American Heart Association.

SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Sept. 7, 2009

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