Effects of Obesity on Fertility Baltimore MD

Women who become obese -- a step above overweight -- by the age of 18 are more likely to become infertile and develop polycystic ovarian syndrome than others, new research suggests. These obese young women also less likely to become pregnant than women who become obese when they're older, according to the results of a study of 1,538 patients who were undergoing bariatric surgery at clinics in the United States.

Frank J Bottiglieri MD
(410) 339-7640
6569 N Charles St
Towson, MD
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Obstetrics & Gynecology

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Charles Lee Robinson, MD
(228) 863-9977
701 W Pratt St
Baltimore, MD
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Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1982

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Charles Young Davis, MD
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Medical School: George Washington Univ Sch Of Med & Hlth Sci, Washington Dc 20037
Graduation Year: 1965

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Paul Gilbert Crawford, MD
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Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In Shreveport, Shreveport La 71130
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Hospital: Highland Hospital, Shreveport, La; Willis -Knighton Med Ctr, Shreveport, La
Group Practice: Pierremont Women's Clinic

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James Danl Moore, MD
(276) 676-7000
22 S Greene St
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Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
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Alexander Agthe
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22 S Greene St
Baltimore, MD
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James Sandidge Dunn Jr, MD
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Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In New Orleans, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1995

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Edward S Ahn, MD
(410) 328-6034
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Baltimore, MD
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Medical School: Catholic Med Coll, Chongno-Ku, Seoul, So Korea
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Hugh E Mighty
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Sanjeevani Kulkarni, MD
(410) 679-5755
827 Linden Ave
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Female
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Medical School: Gandhi Med Coll, Univ Hlth Sci, Vijayawada, Hyderabad, Ap, India
Graduation Year: 1966
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Hospital: Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore, Md; St Joseph Hospital, Baltimore, Md
Group Practice: Doctor'S Weight Loss Program

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Effects of Obesity on Fertility

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FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Women who become obese -- a step above overweight -- by the age of 18 are more likely to become infertile and develop polycystic ovarian syndrome than others, new research suggests.

These obese young women also less likely to become pregnant than women who become obese when they're older, according to the results of a study of 1,538 patients who were undergoing bariatric surgery at clinics in the United States. The women completed surveys about their medical and sexual histories.

Overall, however, the women in the study, who ranged in age from 18 to 78 years, were as likely to have been pregnant and to have given birth to at least one live child as women in the general population. Seventy-nine percent of those who took part in the study had been pregnant at least once, and 74 percent had at least one live birth, the researchers found.

About half of the study participants aged 18 to 44 who could become pregnant said they wouldn't try to have more children after bariatric surgery. The women in this group hadn't reached menopause and weren't sterilized, didn't have partners who were sterilized, and didn't have some other obstacle in the way of pregnancy.

However, 30 percent of the women who could still become pregnant stated that pregnancy was very important to them, and one-third of this group planned to get pregnant within two years of undergoing bariatric surgery, the study authors noted.

"As the incidence of obesity increases in the United States, women's health care practitioners are likely to care for a substantial number of patients who will undergo bariatric surgery. Studies like this one are extremely useful to help us determine how to advise these patients and best meet their needs," said Dr. William Gibbons, president-elect of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, in a news release from the society.

The study findings appeared in the Oct. 7 online edition of the journal Fertility and Sterility.

More information

Learn more about bariatric surgery from the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

SOURCE: American Society for Reproductive Medicine, news release, Oct. 8, 2009

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