Epileptic Seizures During Pregnancy Baltimore MD

Epileptic seizures during pregnancy increase the likelihood of premature and small babies, says a new study. Taiwanese researchers compared children born to 1,016 women with epilepsy with those born to 8,128 women without epilepsy. During pregnancy, 503 of the women with epilepsy had seizures and 513 did not.

Frank J Bottiglieri MD
(410) 339-7640
6569 N Charles St
Towson, MD
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Earl Lynn Horton, MD
(301) 839-8777
827 Linden Ave
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Albany Med Coll, Albany Ny 12208
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided by:
Michelle Morganti, MD
200 E 33rd St
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med, Omaha Ne 68178
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided by:
Narong Ruchira
(410) 669-3313
821 North Eutaw Street
Baltimore, MD
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
A P Schreiber, MD
(201) 438-2824
301 Saint Paul St
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Wien, Med Fak, Wien, Austria (407-26 3/1938 To 6/1945)
Graduation Year: 1962

Data Provided by:
Nibondh Chaiyupatumpa, MD
827 Linden Ave
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mahidol Univ-Siriraj Hosp, Fac Of Med, Bangkok, Thailand
Graduation Year: 1970

Data Provided by:
Michele Barbara Berkeley, MD
201 E University Pkwy
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Harry W Johnson
(410) 328-6640
419 W Redwood St
Baltimore, MD
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Nathan Goldar Berger, MD
(410) 554-2683
200 E 33rd St Ste 487
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Reproductive Endocrinology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1979
Hospital
Hospital: Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Md

Data Provided by:
Susan J Dulkerian
(410) 328-6749
22 S Greene St
Baltimore, MD
Specialty
Pediatrics, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Epileptic Seizures During Pregnancy

Provided By:

Epileptic seizures during pregnancy increase the likelihood of premature and small babies, says a new study.

Taiwanese researchers compared children born to 1,016 women with epilepsy with those born to 8,128 women without epilepsy. During pregnancy, 503 of the women with epilepsy had seizures and 513 did not.

Those who had seizures while pregnant were 36 percent more likely than women who did not have epilepsy to have had a baby that weighed less than 5.5 pounds (considered low birth weight), 63 percent more likely to deliver prematurely (before 37 weeks) and 37 percent more likely to have a baby who was small for gestational age.

In another comparison, women with epilepsy who had seizures during pregnancy were 34 percent more likely to have a baby who was small for gestational age than were women with epilepsy who did not have seizures while pregnant.

The study is in the August issue of Archives of Neurology.

Some earlier studies suggested a link between epilepsy and adverse pregnancy outcomes, but others found no connection.

The findings of the new study "suggest that it is the seizures themselves that seem to contribute greatly to the increased risk of infants being delivered preterm, of low birth weight and small for gestational age," wrote Yi-Hua Chen, of Tai Pei Medical University in Taiwan, and colleagues. "For women who remained seizure-free throughout pregnancy, null or mild risk was identified, compared with unaffected women."

Epileptic seizures can affect pregnancy outcomes in a number of ways. Seizures can cause trauma that ruptures fetal membranes, increasing the risk for infection and early delivery. Or seizures can cause contractions in the uterus that cause tension and acute injury.

The researchers emphasized the need for intervention strategies, such as helping women control seizures for a period of time before pregnancy, assisting them in sleeping better, providing education about the risks of seizures while pregnant and teaching them how to cope with stress.

More information

The Epilepsy Foundation has more about women and epilepsy.

SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Aug. 10, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com