Extending your Home with a Deck Baltimore MD

Instead of spending on pricey vacations, more people in Baltimore are turning to money-saving alternatives in their own backyards. Upgrading or adding a deck is a great way to take advantage of outdoor living spaces.

Fick Bros. Roofing & Exterior Remodeling Company
1200 E. 25th Street
Baltimore, MD
Services
Specialty Contractor, Remodeler
Hours
2010 Guildmaster with Distinction
Membership Organizations
2006 Torch Award Winner, Marketplace Excellence, BBB Greater MD, Better Business Bureau, Cedar Shake & Shingle Bureau, CertainTeed Master Craftsman, CertainTeed Select Shingle Roofer, Certified Contractors Network (CCN), DaVinci Masterpiece Contractor, EnergyStar, Home Builders Association of Maryland, Installation Masters, Maryland Improvement Contractors Association, Mid Atlantic Roofing Contractors Association, National Association of Home Builders, National Association of the Remodeling Indu

Data Provided by:
ADR Builders, Ltd.
1850 York Rd, Suite H
Timonium, MD
Service Type
Designer / Architect, Remodeler
Awards
2007 Guildmaster with Highest Distinction

Data Provided by:
Villa Builders, Inc.
1511 Ritchie Highway, suite 101A
Arnold, MD
Services
Custom Builder, Remodeler
Membership Organizations
2008 CotY Awards, National Association of the Remodeling Industry, National Kitchen and Bath Association, Professional Remodeler Best of the Best Design Award

Data Provided by:
Valcan Construction Materials LP Mideast Division
(410) 837-2015
Westport
Baltimore, MD
 
East Coast Organics
(410) 889-8784
2800 Sisson Street
Baltimore, MD
 
Atlantic Remodeling
8015 Corporate Dr., Suite I
Baltimore, MD
Services
Remodeler, Specialty Contractor
Membership Organizations
Qualified Remodeler Top 500, Qualified Remodeler Top 500 2009

Data Provided by:
Starcom Design Build
8835-M Columbia 100 Pkwy
Columbia, MD
Services
Remodeler

Data Provided by:
Thomas Clark
Thomas Clark Architects
410 539 6830
10 N. Calvert Street, Suite 045
Baltimore, MD
 
Chesapeake Lawn Care Inc
(410) 256-8588
4265 Chapel Road
Baltimore, MD
 
Carroll Independent Fuel
(410) 366-0340
2700 Loch Raven Road
Baltimore, MD
 
Data Provided by:

Extending your Home with a Deck

Home Improvements: Adding, upgrading a deck a good investment

Instead of spending on pricey vacations, more Americans are turning to money-saving alternatives in their own backyards. Upgrading or adding a deck is a great way to take advantage of outdoor living spaces.

Although it now may seem like a challenging time to invest in your home, enhancing your outdoor living space can be cost-effective. Exterior and replacement projects bring homeowners the best return on investment, according to Remodeling Magazine's annual Cost vs. Value report.

When making a decision on your available decking options, you may want to consider the three common types of decking material:

Composite

Composite decking is made from a blend of woods and recycled plastic, vinyl or acrylic materials that prolong the life of the deck. Although the initial price of composite decking may be higher compared to other types of wood, the expected lifespan can save money in the long run.

Many homeowners are attracted to composite decking because it provides the appearance of real wood, requires little maintenance and typically comes with a longer warranty period.

Pressure-treated

Pressure-treated wood contains preservatives that provide protection against termites, insects and fungal decay. Applying preservatives is an attempt to slow drying which means less shrinkage occurs and the surface of the wood remains smoother longer.

In order to protect a pressure-treated deck against weather and premature aging, the wood requires regular power washing and yearly application of stain and sealer.

Cedar

Cedar is another commonly used decking material because it is attractive, easy to work with and is naturally rot- and insect-resistant. Cedar wood decking material has less than half the swelling and shrinking tendencies of other domestic softwoods.

If cedar wood goes untreated, over time it will lose its natural golden hue and may turn a silver grey color. The average lifespan of cedar is roughly 10 years and, in order to double the lifespan, regular applications of staining and waterproofing are highly recommended.

When you're ready to begin creating or improving your outdoor living space, research your options. Be sure you're picking the best available material to ensure your deck will last you many more summer months to come.

-- ARA

Decorating Tip: How to create a custom kitchen

By adding a few decorative accents, homeowners can not only create a custom-looking kitchen, they can create a space that reflects a specific look. Here are some cost-effective renovation tips:

- Cabinetry accents work to enhance any kitchen's style with details such as feet, corbels, ornamental onlays and molding inserts.

- Adding splashes of color is a great way to create a fun, vibrant look while keeping the kitchen functional. Try adding tile details such as a colorful backsplash behind the stove. Or, purchase fresh towels and accessories for your kitchen in a coordinated, colorful design.

- Displaying decorative items is an easy way to add your own personal touch. Things like porcelain collectables, wine bottles or fine china are all types of decorative items that help create a personal space that sparks conversation with guests.

-- ARA

Home-Selling Tip: Make the most of your space

Remember that potential buyers are looking for more than just comfortable living space. They're looking for storage space, too.

Sellers should make sure attics and basements are clean and free of unnecessary items.

Similarly, the better organized a closet, the larger it appears. Now's the time to box up those unwanted clothes and donate them to charity.

-- RE/MAX

How T Mow the lawn safely

Safety organizations offer the following tips for lawnmower safety:

- Children should be at least 12 years old before they operate any lawn mower, and at least 16 years old for a ride-on mower. Children should never be passengers on ride-on mowers.

- Always wear sturdy shoes while mowing – not sandals.

- Pick up stones, toys and debris first from the lawn to prevent injuries from flying objects.

- Always wear eye and hearing protection.

- Use a mower with a control that stops it from moving forward if the handle is released.

- Wait for blades to stop completely before removing the grass catcher, unclogging the discharge chute, or crossing gravel roads. (As a safety feature, some newer models have a blade/brake clutch that stops the blade each time the operator releases the handle.)

-- American Academy of Pediatrics

Did You Know …

According to a survey of 1,000 Americans, achieving environmental benefits or energy savings is the No. 1 reason they use clothesline or outside drying racks. -- The Lehigh Group

Garden Guide: Easy container gardens brighten your day

- Try old kitchen kettles or buckets you no longer use, salvaged old pots found in your garage, or colorful containers found at your local thrift store.

- Be sure your planter selections have proper drainage. If they don't have drain holes, you'll need to drill them. To ensure proper drainage for your plants, add a material such as rocks or terra cotta pieces to the bottom of your container to create an air space.

- Fill the container with potting soil until two-thirds full, leaving 4 to 5 inches for plants. Next, take the plant plugs and set them in the pot. Rearrange until you are satisfied, fill in with potting soil and water thoroughly.

-- ARA

Backyard Buddies: Bird proof your home

Most homes and gardens provide the three elements necessary for a birds' survival: food, water and shelter.

Whether you anticipate birds returning to your home, or are dealing with a pest bird problem now, addressing these three elements will make it easy to bird proof a home.

Taking away food or water sources, and blocking off ideal nesting spots like dryer vents and eaves will help send pest birds packing.

There are many different bird deterrents available in today's market that can be used for a wide variety of problems. Bird deterrents usually fit into four categories: visual deterrents, sound deterrents, physical deterrents, and liquid repellents.

-- ARA

GateHouse News Service