Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Salisbury MD

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is the third of the three "core" occupational fields within the overall Geospatial Technology industry. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) isthe technology that uses specialized computer systems to work with, interrelate, and analyze virtually all forms of spatial data.

Rayo de Luz
(410) 860-6802
118 Holland ave.
Salisbury, MD
 
Ottley Music School Inc
(301) 454-0991
6525 Belcrest Rd
Hyattsville, MD

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Fun with Foreign Language
(443) 616-7343
6622 Loch Raven Boulevard
Towson, MD
 
Maryland Educational Opportunity
(410) 728-3400
2500 E Northern Parkway
Baltimore, MD
 
Unitas Classical Christian Cooperative
(301) 464-6344
377 West Central Ave
Davidsonville, MD
 
Maryland Higher Education Commission
(410) 260-4500
Suite 400
Annapolis, MD
 
Baltimore School For Drumming
(410) 661-4535
602 Providence Rd
Towson, MD

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Kunz Inc
(410) 737-0130
1630 Sulphur Spring Rd
Baltimore, MD
 
Priddy Guitar Studios
(443) 889-6099
992 Pebblestone Rd
Pasadena, MD

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Broadcasting Institute Of Maryland
(410) 254-2770
7200 Harford Rd
Baltimore, MD
 
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Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is the third of the three "core" occupational fields within the overall Geospatial Technology industry.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is the technology that uses specialized computer systems to work with, interrelate, and analyze virtually all forms of spatial data. Typically, a GIS consists of three major components:

  • a database of geospatial and thematic data;
  • a capacity to spatially model or analyze the data; and
  • a graphical display capability.

GIS analysts turn geographic data into maps and decision-making tools. They create large databases of geographic information and use them to solve problems. GIS analysts often specialize in one of three major activities:

  • making maps;
  • combining mapmaking with specialized analysis; or
  • developing GIS software.

In addition to their computer applications and databases, GIS analysts use other specialized tools in their work, including multi-dimensional graphic display devices and equipment.

GIS analysts - like other Geospatial Technology professionals - can be found working in various local, state, and federal government agencies, as well as in a wide-range of related scientific and technical fields, such as agriculture and soils; archeology; biology; cartography; ecology; environmental sciences; forestry and range; geodesy; geography; geology; hydrology and water resources; land appraisal and real estate; medicine; transportation; urban planning and development, and more.

Sources: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS).

The following Web sites offer a sampling of the broad range of job and career possibilities within the Geospatial Technology industry, including those for Geographic Information Specialists:

  • Geospatial Information and Technology Association (GITA) - Career Center
  • Great Lakes Commission (GLC) - ASPRS Job Center
  • Management Association for Private Photogrammetric Surveyors (MAPPS) -
    Employment Opportunities in Member Firms
  • University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS)
  • Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA)

Find out more at CareerVoyages.gov