Heart Damage Treatments Salisbury MD

During a heart attack, vessels that supply blood to the heart become blocked, preventing enough oxygen from getting through. The heart muscle dies or is permanently damaged.

John Robert Mc Lean, MD
(410) 749-4949
440 Rolling Rd
Salisbury, MD
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Md Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21201
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided by:
Anthony Jay Frey, MD
(410) 749-4949
5454 Royal Mile Blvd
Salisbury, MD
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Brooklyn, Coll Of Med, Brooklyn Ny 11203
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided by:
Ramesh Kumar Agarwal, MD
(410) 341-0300
5519 E Nithsdale Dr
Salisbury, MD
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Patna Med Coll, Patna Univ, Bihar, India
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
Stephan Pavlos, MD
(410) 749-8906
5405 Royal Mile Blvd
Salisbury, MD
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Md Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21201
Graduation Year: 1986
Hospital
Hospital: Peninsula Regional Med Center, Salisbury, Md
Group Practice: Peninsula Cardiology Associates Pa

Data Provided by:
Joseph Alan Cinderella, MD
(410) 334-2227
100 E Carroll St
Salisbury, MD
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mi Med Sch, Ann Arbor Mi 48109
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: Peninsula Regional Med Center, Salisbury, Md; Atlantic Gen Hosp, Berlin, Md
Group Practice: Mc Lean Frey & Assoc

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Benjamin H Meyer, MD, FACC
(410) 749-8942
26283 High Banks Dr
Salisbury, MD
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

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Prakash Ramaji Dalal, MD
(410) 749-5419
1408 Bell Island Trl
Salisbury, MD
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Indira Ghandi Med Coll, Nagpur Univ, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1973
Hospital
Hospital: Peninsula Regional Med Center, Salisbury, Md
Group Practice: Agarwal & Assoc

Data Provided by:
Anthony J Frey
(410) 341-0300
1205 Pemberton Dr
Salisbury, MD
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Bal K Agarwal, MD
(410) 749-5419
5450 Royal Mile Blvd
Salisbury, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Diseases
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Sawai Man Singh Med Coll, Univ Of Rajast
Graduation Year: 1963

Data Provided by:
Tomasz A Swierkosz, MD
(410) 546-2480
26377 Manchester Ct
Salisbury, MD
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Coll Med, Univ Jagiellonski, Krakow, Poland
Graduation Year: 1989

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Heart Damage Treatments

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Doctors have been unable to help injured heart tissue renew itself after a heart attack -- until now.

During a heart attack, vessels that supply blood to the heart become blocked, preventing enough oxygen from getting through. The heart muscle dies or is permanently damaged.

But researchers at Children's Hospital Boston report progress toward someday being ale to regenerate heart tissue after a heart attack or heart failure and even in children who are born with congenital heart defects.

In a study on mice, they showed that neuregulin 1 (NRG1), a growth factor involved in the development of the heart and nervous system, can fuel heart-muscle growth and recovery of cardiac function when injected after a heart attack.

This is a significant development because coronary heart disease, which causes heart attack and angina, is the leading cause of death in America.

After birth, heart-muscle cells stop dividing and proliferating. But experts, led by Dr. Bernhard Kuhn and Kevin Bersell of the cardiology department at Children's, restarted the cell cycle with NRG1, spurring the heart-muscle cells to divide and make copies of themselves.

When the team injected NRG1 into live mice once a day for three months after the animals had heart attacks, heart regeneration increased and the pumping function improved, compared with untreated mice.

In addition, the NRG1-injected mice did not show some common aftereffects of heart failure.

The study, funded by the cardiology department at Children's Hospital Boston, the Charles Hood Foundation and the American Heart Association, found that cell growth does not have to come from stem cells. A report on the research appears in the July 24 issue of Cell.

"Although many efforts have focused on stem cell-based strategies, our work suggests that stem cells aren't required and that stimulating differentiated cardiomyocytes [heart-muscle cells] to proliferate may be a viable alternative," Kuhn, the study's senior investigator, said in a news release from the hospital.

More information

The American Heart Association has tips on maintaining a healthy heart.

SOURCE: Children's Hospital Boston, news release, July 23, 2009

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