Living with Dementia Salisbury MD

Many people think of hospice care as being for the dying, and therefore not appropriate for someone who has “only” been diagnosed with dementia. However, hospice care can help greatly in the day-to-day living of a person with dementia.

Coastal Hospice
(410) 742-8732
2604 Old Ocean City Rd
Salisbury, MD

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Deer's Head Hospice
(410) 543-4000
PO Box 2018
Salisbury, MD
Services
Nursing homes, Hospice

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Coastal Hospice, Inc.
(410) 742-8732
2604 Old Ocean City Road
Salisbury, MD
Services
Hospice Care

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Joseph Richey House, The
(410) 523-2150
838 N Eutaw St
Baltimore, MD

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Deer's Head Hospice
(410) 543-4000
PO Box 2018
Salisbury, MD
Services
Nursing homes, Hospice

Data Provided by:
Deer's Head Hospice
(410) 543-4000
PO Box 2018
Salisbury, MD
Services
Hospice Care

Data Provided by:
Coastal Hospice, Inc.
(410) 742-8732
2604 Old Ocean City Road
Salisbury, MD
Services
Nursing homes, Hospice

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Hospice of Charles County
(301) 934-1268
105 LaGrange Avenue
La Plata, MD
Services
Nursing homes, Hospice

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Keswick At Home
(410) 662-4202
711 West 40th Street
Baltimore, MD
Services
Nursing homes, In home, Hospice

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Hospice Caring
(301) 869-4673
707 Conservation Ln Ste 100
Gaithersburg, MD

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Living with Dementia

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What is dementia? And perhaps just as importantly, what isn’t it? In the coming months, I’ll be writing a series of articles on dementia to address the concerns of caregivers and family members who have a loved one living with dementia. Many people think of hospice care as being for the dying, and therefore not appropriate for someone who has “only” been diagnosed with dementia. However, hospice care can help greatly in the day-to-day living of a person with dementia.

Dementia refers to a decline in the mental abilities of a person. It is not a diagnosis in itself. And it is not synonymous with mental illness. When we say a person has dementia, we are referring to symptoms that include memory loss, absentmindedness, confusion, the inability to think rationally, a decline in social skills, and inappropriate emotional reactions. There are many types of dementia. Alzheimer’s is the most common form and accounts for approximately 75% of all dementias.1 Alzheimer’s is a degenerative disease that will ultimately become fatal; the mortality rate due to this disease is increasing faster than any other leading fatal condition. In 2004, it was the fifth leading cause of death among Americans older than 65 years of age2. There are hospice eligibility guidelines for people with different types of dementias, but few of these patients ever receive hospice services. New research published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management sheds new light on...Click here to read more from Gilbert Guide