Rainscreen Drainage Plane System Arlington VA

During any sort of construction, water in buildings isn't funny. Neither is mold, but both are facts of life.

Probuilt Deck And Fence
(301) 474-3550
5110 Roanoke Place, Suite 106
College Park, MD

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(301) 919-1729
14005 Westview Forest Dr
Bowie, MD

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Baileys Industries
(301) 916-5140
Po Box 4166615 S. Frederick Ave
Gaithersburg, MD

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Bozzuto Construction
(703) 379-2402
4220 Campbell Ave
Arlington, VA
 
BHI International Inc
(800) 214-1014
P.O. Box 1470
Washington, DC
 
The Engineering Groupe
(703) 670-0985
13580 Groupe Drive, Suite 200
Woodbridge, VA

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Artitech Construction
(301) 519-6997
7809 Breezy Down Ter
Rockville, MD

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Pepco Energy Services
(703) 253-1644
1300 N. 17th St., Ste. 1600
Arlington, VA
 
Sigal Construction Corporation
(703) 302-1500
2231 Crystal Dr.
Washington, DC
 
Perkins + Will
(202) 737-1020
2100 M St., NW
Washington, DC
 
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Rainscreen Drainage Plane System

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Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: July 1, 2008

By Barbara Headrick

It rains a lot in the Pacific Northwest. Everyone knows that. We are often accused of walking around with “webbed feet.” Funny, but only if you're a duck!

However, water in buildings isn't funny. Neither is mold. Both are facts of life, and not just in the Northwest.

Every mason in the U.S. and Canada has to deal with water infiltration –through window and door cuts, via wind-driven rain, and inherently, from the installation of the product itself. Mortar and grout contain a very high percentage of water.

Ask yourself, “Where should that water go?”

The answer is obvious – the water needs to be directed “out” of the building, not “in.” The result of water “in” a building quickly becomes obvious – mold. Once moisture has penetrated deep into a wall system through the moisture-resistant construction paper and into the exterior sheathing, the wall is “deep” wet. Airflow that exists in most wall systems is a slight draft that does not dry this condition out quickly. The wall is now in serious trouble.

Use of a rainscreen drainage plane (moisture control and weep system) is the recommended method to direct moisture out of and away from the wall. So why then do most masons, even architects, steer away from insisting upon and/or specifying a rainscreen drainage plane system? The answer, as always, is dollars and cents.

Click here to read full article from Masonry Construction

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