Rainscreen Drainage Plane System Frederick MD

During any sort of construction, water in buildings isn't funny. Neither is mold, but both are facts of life.

J E S Construction Inc
(301) 790-0446
6830-B Putman Rd
Thurmont, MD

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Creede Bath & Home
(301) 748-6868
5010B Green Valley Rd
Monrovia, MD
 
RPD CORP t/a:
(301) 983-1111
PO Box111
Damascus, MD
Services
Drainage Correction, Stormwater Control,, Waterproofing, Masonry, Grading-Excavation, Structural Repairs, Foundation Repairs/Replacement, Basement Waterproofing, s

O'Dell Concrete
(717) 965-0901
12336 Coppermine Road
Union Bridge, MD
 
Cedarbrook Deck & Patio Inc
(410) 775-1444
10232 Fountain School Rd
Union Bridge, MD
 
BT Martin Contractors
(240) 529-5131
7130 Rock Creek Dr
Frederick, MD
 
Cordell Custom Homes and Remodeling
301-898-3386 or 301-606-1446
9455 Longs Mill Road
Rocky Ridge, MD
 
Archer Contractors
(301) 983-1111
PO Box 111
Damascus, MD
Services
Drainage

A Cut Above Carpentry
(301) 824-7151
101 Irene Way
Smithsburg, MD
Services
Remodeling, Home improvement, Home repair, Hardwood and laminate flooring installation, carpentry, and much more
Awards
EPA Leadsafe Certified Firm, JD Power and Assoc.

ABC Sales Inc.
(301) 447-6222
882 W. Main Street
Emmisburg, MD
Services
Out Door Landscape Supplies
Awards
MBE/DBE/SBE

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Rainscreen Drainage Plane System

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Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: July 1, 2008

By Barbara Headrick

It rains a lot in the Pacific Northwest. Everyone knows that. We are often accused of walking around with “webbed feet.” Funny, but only if you're a duck!

However, water in buildings isn't funny. Neither is mold. Both are facts of life, and not just in the Northwest.

Every mason in the U.S. and Canada has to deal with water infiltration –through window and door cuts, via wind-driven rain, and inherently, from the installation of the product itself. Mortar and grout contain a very high percentage of water.

Ask yourself, “Where should that water go?”

The answer is obvious – the water needs to be directed “out” of the building, not “in.” The result of water “in” a building quickly becomes obvious – mold. Once moisture has penetrated deep into a wall system through the moisture-resistant construction paper and into the exterior sheathing, the wall is “deep” wet. Airflow that exists in most wall systems is a slight draft that does not dry this condition out quickly. The wall is now in serious trouble.

Use of a rainscreen drainage plane (moisture control and weep system) is the recommended method to direct moisture out of and away from the wall. So why then do most masons, even architects, steer away from insisting upon and/or specifying a rainscreen drainage plane system? The answer, as always, is dollars and cents.

Click here to read full article from Masonry Construction

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