Rainscreen Drainage Plane System Waldorf MD

During any sort of construction, water in buildings isn't funny. Neither is mold, but both are facts of life.

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LHI DESIGNS
(703) 401-3141
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LHI & Design
(703) 401-3141
6537 Riefton ct.
Alex., VA
Services
Architectural plans and permits, constructions and design

LHI & Design
(703) 401-3141
6537 Riefton Ct
Alexandria, VA
Services
Architectural design / residential construction
Prices and/or Promotions
Free design plus permit drawings if awarded construction contract

Handy Home Team inc
(240) 350-9316
6809 District Heights Pkwy
District Heights , MD
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maintenance, rehab ,building
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$240 dollars per day

Rainscreen Drainage Plane System

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Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: July 1, 2008

By Barbara Headrick

It rains a lot in the Pacific Northwest. Everyone knows that. We are often accused of walking around with “webbed feet.” Funny, but only if you're a duck!

However, water in buildings isn't funny. Neither is mold. Both are facts of life, and not just in the Northwest.

Every mason in the U.S. and Canada has to deal with water infiltration –through window and door cuts, via wind-driven rain, and inherently, from the installation of the product itself. Mortar and grout contain a very high percentage of water.

Ask yourself, “Where should that water go?”

The answer is obvious – the water needs to be directed “out” of the building, not “in.” The result of water “in” a building quickly becomes obvious – mold. Once moisture has penetrated deep into a wall system through the moisture-resistant construction paper and into the exterior sheathing, the wall is “deep” wet. Airflow that exists in most wall systems is a slight draft that does not dry this condition out quickly. The wall is now in serious trouble.

Use of a rainscreen drainage plane (moisture control and weep system) is the recommended method to direct moisture out of and away from the wall. So why then do most masons, even architects, steer away from insisting upon and/or specifying a rainscreen drainage plane system? The answer, as always, is dollars and cents.

Click here to read full article from Masonry Construction

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